About Bill Holstein

Award-winning editor, author and journalist, Bill has spent more than 35 years specializing in global business issues that affect chief executive officers and boards of directors as well as individual Americans. Areas of interest include innovation, organizational transformation, competitiveness and governance with a special emphasis on the automotive and high tech industries. His books have been published in Japanese, Chinese, Portugese and Danish. See next tab “Books” for a list.

Career

Independent (April 2007–current)

Bill writes for three magazines, Chief Executive, Compass and Strategy + Business, on technology and top management subjects. His seventh book, “How The ThinkPad Changed the World–And Is Shaping the Future,” will be published by Skyhorse in the spring of 2017. He also has been active as board member and dinner co-chair for the Overseas Press Club and as president of the Overseas Press Club Foundation, which grants scholarships and fellowships to college students who wish to become foreign correspondents.

Editor in Chief of Directorship magazine (May 2006-March 2007)
This magazine was aimed at boards of directors, senior managers who engage with boards, and lawyers, accountants, search firms, consultants and other specialists who work for boards.

Editor in Chief of Chief Executive magazine (January 2003-April 2006)
Completely redesigned this magazine and won Folio’s 2005 Eddie Gold Award for best business-to-business magazine in the category and the Ozzie Gold Award for best cover design.

Independent (July 2001-January 2003)
Contributor to Fortune, The New York Times, Business 2.0, Chief Executive, Corporate Board Member and Politique Internationale. Wrote major articles for Business 2.0 on such subjects as IBM’s research labs, General Motor’s OnStar division, and Corning’s efforts to recover from the fiber optic collapse. Concentrated primarily on Asian subjects for Fortune, with stories on Samsung Electronics and Canon. Interviewed former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker for Politique Internationale.

Editor at Large, Business 2.0 (February-July 2001)
Had major writing responsibilities and produced stories on Corning, DaimlerChrysler, Ford Motor, IBM, and Porsche.

Senior Writer, U.S. News & World Report (October 1996-February 2001)
Wrote major stories pertaining to business, economics and technology in a global context. Cover stories included “SWEATSHOP CHRISTMAS,” “THE AMAZING ECONOMY,” “THE INTERNET STOCK BUBBLE,” “WIRELESS WONDERS,” “COOL CARS,” and “RUNWAY RAGE.” CEOs interviewed included Chrysler’s Robert Eaton, Corning’s Roger Ackerman, DaimlerChrysler’s Jurgen Schrempp, Ford’s Jacques Nasser, Intel’s Andy Grove, Coca Cola’s Roberto Goizueta, and Kodak’s George Fisher.

World Editor, BusinessWeek (April 1985-October 1996)
Held a series of positions in the International Department, culminating in becoming World Editor, with responsibility for managing major cover stories for both the domestic and international editions. Cover stories included: “JAPAN’S NEW IDENTITY,” “CHINA: The Making of an Economic Giant,” “MIGHTY MITSUBISHI,” “JAPAN: Remaking a Nation” (winner of the Overseas Press Club award for best magazine article on foreign affairs), “MADE IN THE U.S.A.,” “HOT SPOTS,” and “THE STATELESS CORPORATION.”

Director, Corporate Writing, American Express (April 1983-April 1985)
Wrote speeches for top executives, including Chairman James D. Robinson III and President Sandy Weill, as well as annual reports and other publications.

Correspondent and editor, United Press International (September 1973-April 1983)
After three years in Lansing, Michigan, and three years in New York on the Cables Desk, was transferred to Hong Kong as Deputy Asian Editor in 1979. Managed a 24-hour Asian news desk with 14 staffers in Hong Kong and bureaus throughout the region. Also covered major news stories, including the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Was declared persona non grata and placed under house arrest by Soviets in Kabul; deported to India. Other stories included 1979 Tokyo Economic Summit, the Vietnamese boat people exodus, the OPEC meeting in Bali, and the Moslem insurrection in the southern Philippines. Won the Overseas Press Club award in 1980 for best overseas economic reporting—based on stories about traveling in southern China and about China’s economic modernization drive.

Share this article

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Education

National Merit Scholar. Graduated with honors from Michigan State University with degree in European intellectual history.

Completed studies at a summer program at Oxford University (Exeter College).

Share this article

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Awards

Bill has received the following awards:

  • Overseas Press Club of America award for his coverage of China as a correspondent for United Press International
  • Overseas Press Club of America award for editing a Business Week cover story entitled, “Rethinking Japan”
  • Eddie award fromFolio magazine for the issue of Chief Executive magazine depicted below

Share this article

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Boards & Affiliations

Bill has been very active in organizations that help defend and promote the profession of journalism and its practitioners:

TN_OPCOverseas Press Club (OPCofAmerica.org): Bill was president from 1994 to 1996 and remains active on the board. He has been chairman of the annual Awards Dinner for several years. He is also chair of the judging panel for the Malcolm Forbes Award for best business reporting from abroad in newspapers and news agencies.

President, Overseas Press Club of America, June 1994-July 1996. Lifetime board member.

 

TN_OPCFOverseas Press Club Foundation (OverseasPressClubFoundation.org): Bill has been president since 1996. The Foundation, a closely related sister of the OPC, gives 15 scholarships and internships to college students who aspire to become foreign correspondents. It is the largest, most visible national program that encourages students to become correspondents. The annual scholarship/internship luncheon is held every February at the Yale Club in Manhattan.

The current endowment exceeds $1 million. This position requires managing a board of directors and an executive director. The OPC Foundation has recently emerged as the fiscal sponsor for A Culture of Safety, the organization that the news industry and freelancers have established to promote the training and best treatment of freelancers around the world.

Share this article

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Share this article

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS